Armenia 1998

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Yearbook 1998

Armenia. The conflict surrounding the Armenian enclave of Nagorno-Karabakh in Azerbaijan in February forced Armenian President Levon Ter-Petrosian to resign. He wanted to end an economic boycott against Armenia from the oil-rich Azerbaijan and its allied Turkey. Therefore, he sought a negotiation solution around Nagorno-Karabakh and was prepared for territorial concessions to reach his goal.

However, such a compromise was inconceivable for the government, the National Assembly and large sections of the population. Demonstrations were conducted against Ter-Petrosian and the criticism was led by Prime Minister Robert Kotjarjan. This was elected in March as new president. However, observers from the European Security Organization OSCE reported on the irregularities in the election.

According to Countryaah, the capital of Armenia is Yerevan. Kotjarjan was formerly Nagorno-Karabakh’s president and led the enclave’s outbreak of war against Azerbaijan. Despite its hard line in the conflict, Kotjarjan, as newly appointed president, promised to continue the peace talks led by the OSCE. This happened at a meeting in Moscow with Azerbaijan President Gejdar Alijev. In April, Kotjarjan appointed former finance minister Armen Darbinjan as new prime minister. He advocates rapid privatization and extensive economic reform.

Darbinjan visited Azerbaijan in September, the first visit of its kind since the war. However, no progress was made in the peace talks.

December

Azerbaijani soldiers are suspected of war crimes

13th of December

The ceasefire from 9 November is broken. Azerbaijan reports that four Azeri soldiers have lost their lives, while Armenia reports some injured. The next day, it emerges that two soldiers from Azerbaijan have legal recourse to wait in their home country for mutilating the bodies of Armenian soldiers during the autumn war over Nagorno-Karabakh. The two filmed their actions and posted the films on social media. Two other soldiers are said to have desecrated Armenian tombstones.

Azerbaijan celebrates victory in war

December 10th

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan is taking part in Azerbaijan’s celebration of the victory over Armenia in the recent Nagorno-Karabakh war. In a military parade held in Baku, drones of Turkish manufacture are among the equipment on display. On the same day, Amnesty International calls on both Azerbaijan and Armenia to investigate allegations of war crimes; such accusations are leveled against both sides.

Almost 5,500 died in the autumn war

December 3rd

Azerbaijan publishes for the first time an indication of how many lives were claimed in the autumn war over Nagorno-Karabakh: 2,783 soldiers have been found dead and another 100 missing. Armenia has previously stated its military losses at 2,425. This means that more than 5,200 soldiers lost their lives. At least 143 civilian casualties are known, on both sides.

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